25 September, 2009

Which School do you belong to?

No. I am not talking about the elementary school that you studied at. I am talking about the School of Software Testing you belong to? I am inspired to write this after James mentioned in one of his recent posts that he was not sure if I think of myself as context-driven. I do think of myself as Context-Driven and I am proud to be a part of the Context Driven School of Testing.


The Seven Basic Principles of the Context-Driven School as listed on the Context Driven Testing website:

1. The value of any practice depends on its context.
2. There are good practices in context, but there are no best practices.
3. People, working together, are the most important part of any project's context.
4. Projects unfold over time in ways that are often not predictable.
5. The product is a solution. If the problem isn't solved, the product doesn't work.
6. Good software testing is a challenging intellectual process.
7. Only through judgment and skill, exercised cooperatively throughout the entire project, are we able to do the right things at the right times to effectively test our products.

Do you see the Freedom and Responsibility that is available in this school of testing? Is this what you have been yearning for? Figure it out yourself. For more information on Context Driven Testing, please visit HERE. A MUST READ for all the context driven testers.

Happy Reading,
Parimala Shankaraiah
http://curioustester.blogspot.com

6 comments:

  1. Hi Pari..

    I also consider myself as being a follower of the context driven school of thought...

    But also would like to add that..from my view point...an element of mental flexibility is also critical for a context driven tester..
    flexibility as in what testing approach the tester takes depending upon the testing context he/she finds himself in...one might have to wear a traditionally inclined hat on some occasions while essentially being a hard core ET tester..

    hope this helps..
    regards
    sunjeet

    P.S - in reposne to your comment on test republic ....actually no i dont have a blog...ummm...too lazy for that...lol !
    hence I'm mostly a passive contributor and a learner on various forums and blogs..

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  2. @Sunjeet
    an element of mental flexibility is also critical for a context driven tester..


    You said it right. ET offers just that. It does not block your ideas in any way. It is a free flow of ideas which become tests and find gaps in the product.

    hence I'm mostly a passive contributor and a learner on various forums and blogs..

    You are a very active contributor in most forums from what I understand. You have good ideas and I think you should consider about blogging in the near future. I would be glad to help you.

    Happy Testing,
    Parimala Shankaraiah
    http://curioustester.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hi Parimala

    Two friends of mine held a presentation based on http://www.io.com/~wazmo/papers/four_schools.pdf, originally written by Bret Petticord, for a very mixed audience some years back. From what I heard, the audience changed their beliefs on which school they belonged to during the whole presentation.

    By talking about that there are different schools we will see that we do not fully agree on all things with testing. Using this presentation as a base for creating arguments can be a really good thing for any test team.

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  4. @ Martin

    I did not want to talk about other schools simply becuase I need to learn about them before I talk about them.

    From what I heard, the audience changed their beliefs on which school they belonged to during the whole presentation.

    I understand and respect that there are good things and bad things, be it Schools of testing or even something else. While we think we follow a certain school of testing, it is good to be open to other schools as well to see if they offer anything better. In the end it is about what works for us and how best it works for us.

    Thanks for pointing me to the presentation. I will go through it. I would be excited to hear more from you and/or your freinds about the audience changing their beliefs if you can share them with me.


    Happy Testing
    Parimala Shankaraiah
    http://curioustester.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
  5. @ I did not want to talk about other schools simply becuase I need to learn about them before I talk about them.

    @ I do think of myself as Context-Driven and I am proud to be a part of the Context Driven School of Testing.

    >> You mean you didn't read and analyse what other schools promote? Without much study on schools of testing how come you felt that you belong to a particular school and it works for you. Is this behaviour a context driven? What fetches you better results at that moment should be followed? I am saying this only because you looked like a hard core fan of context driven testing school but you don't even bothered to go through other schools and thoughts before declaring yourself a context driven tester.

    @ I understand and respect that there are good things and bad things, be it Schools of testing or even something else. While we think we follow a certain school of testing, it is good to be open to other schools as well to see if they offer anything better.

    >> Are there any bad things that you felt when you went through context driven testing?
    >> Can you list few better ideas what other schools offer? You can do it once you learn other schools of testing.

    Cheers,
    Vijay...

    ReplyDelete
  6. @Vijay Savalagi
    You mean you didn't read and analyze what other schools promote? Without much study on schools of testing how come you felt that you belong to a particular school and it works for you. Is this behavior a context driven?


    Great question. I have been part of the scripted school for more than 5 years. I can talk about the scripted school though. We have about 5 schools and I have not researched into the other 3 schools. Again, researching into the schools without really being a part of it is definitely not my style.


    I am saying this only because you looked like a hard core fan of context driven testing school but you don't even bothered to go through other schools and thoughts before declaring yourself a context driven tester.

    I am not a hard core fan of context driven testing simply because context driven testing doesn't mandate you to be a hard core fan of anything. I like this part of context driven testing. I think it takes a lifetime to research and figure out what works best (No best practices please). Being a context driven tester doesn't mean that I am against other schools. I am open to options. I am looking for options :-)

    Are there any bad things that you felt when you went through context driven testing?
    Some context driven testers and thinkers think that context driven testing is the best school. This is a bad one in my view :D.

    Can you list few better ideas what other schools offer? You can do it once you learn other schools of testing
    I can share them once I learn them. Now that you have asked, I think I will consciously learn to learn more about these schools.


    Thank you very much Vijay. You are diligently reading my posts including the older posts and asking questions. I am learning to be thick skinned. Don't hold back. Ask me more questions. I want to be challenged.

    Ever since I started blogging, I am getting to know day by day that my writings are not as clear as my thoughts are. I also wonder if I could talk more on my blog than write. However, Writing is an art and I am learning to be a good one at that. In this journey of mine, I am glad good Samaritans like you not only question my work, but also my beliefs. Thank you once again. It's been a pleasure answering your questions.

    Regards,
    Parimala Shankaraiah

    ReplyDelete